Class Description

In this class researchers from the industry and academia present topics in Computer Science Related to their work or research. If you are taking this class for credit you will be required to write an abstract for each seminar due by Wednesday at 5PM PT of the same week as the presentation. Abstracts will be in pdf format and submitted through the submission page below. Content of the abstracts will be discussed in the first class meeting and in the class schedule below. Number and quality of abstracts relative to the abstract required for each talk will determine the grade. It will be run on a point system for the abstracts as if they were homeworks.

Note because this class is on Monday, when school is not held on Monday there is no class that week. This means our first class is Jan 23. Don't forget!

Time: M 3:30-4:30
Final: None
Location: EP 204
Text: None

Syllabus

This syllabus is an active document describing speakers and topics plus reference material for the seminar talks.

Week

Monday
of that
Week

Topics
wk 1 Jan 9 NO CLASS!
wk 2 Jan 16 NO CLASS! (MLK Day)
wk 3 Jan 23 Class orientation including how homework works for those taking a grade.
wk 4 Jan 30

Speaker: Rachel Otto
Career Development Liaison to the College of Engineering & College of Science
Topic: Advanced Interviewing and Salary & Benefit Negotiation Skills for Computer Science Students
Supporting Documents:
Abstract:
Learn how to approach the interview from the employer's mind frame and how to promote yourself as an ideal fit for the job/company. Then, using reliable resources, prepare for the important conversation of salary/benefit negotiation by knowing your value, market trends, and do's/don'ts for when/how to approach the conversation.
wk 5 Feb 6

Speaker: Seth Samuels (shown), VP of Research and Development and Eric Mann, Director of Product Engineering
Topic: Kochava - Who We Are, What We Do, Why Its Working
Documents:
Abstract: In a sea of millions of mobile apps and billions of dollars of daily advertising spend, Kochava (a mobile tech startup in Sandpoint, ID) has cemented its place as the single pane of glass giving marketers oversight into the effectiveness of their investment.
wk 6 Feb 13

Speaker: Xiaogang (Marshall) Ma, CS Dept., University of Idaho
Topic: SEM+: a tool for concept mapping in the Semantic Web
Supporting Documents:His Power Point slides
Abstract: The amount of domain-specific ontologies and vocabularies encoded in popular Semantic Web languages such as OWL and SKOS grows rapidly as more and more domain scientists realize the power of Semantic Web Technologies. The interlinking between these concepts will enable the possibility of performing data integration and identity recognition, which is crucial in developing applications that use data from multiple sources. In this talk, we discuss a new tool for performing concept mapping called SEM+. SEM+ includes three key steps: (1) use a blocking approach to group possible matching entities into one block and therefore reduce the computation space; (2) use the Information Entropy based Weighted Similarity Model to compute semantic similarity between entity data and suggest possible linking; and (3) create a similarity matrix and select the final matches. Details of those steps will be illustrated with example datasets.
wk 7 Feb 20 NO CLASS! (President's Day)
wk 8 Feb 27

Speaker: Terry Soule and Barrie Robison
Topic: The Darwin's Demons Video Game
Supporting Documents: Polymorphic Games -- Evolving Learning Through Video Game Design
Abstract:
wk 9 Mar 6

Speaker: Dr. Guenever (Qian) Chen
Assistant Professor
Savannah State University
Topic: Towards Realizing Self-Protecting Critical Infrastructures
Supporting Documents:
Abstract: Self-protecting systems know their environment and proactively enhance the network and information security by continuously monitoring measures of system performance to identify normal versus abnormal system behavior. With the usage of mathematical techniques for intrusion detection and response evaluation algorithms, the autonomic approach efficiently responds to a wide range of cyber attacks with little or no human intervention. The development of self-protecting systems will eventually release human burden and reduce human operation errors for managing and securing large-scale complex computing systems. This talk introduces how to realize self-protection in industrial control systems, enterprise systems and healthcare information systems. These critical infrastructures thus can defend themselves from known and unknown cyber threats.
xx Mar 13 NO CLASS! (SPRING BREAK)
wk 10 Mar 20

Speaker: David Manz, Ph.D. Senior Cyber Security Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Topic: Cyber Security Resiliency: Measuring the Myth and the Mission
Supporting Documents:
Abstract: This talk will introduce the core concepts of cyber security resilience, in the context of more traditional resilience and fault tolerance. Current examples of cyber resilience defenses will be described, as will the challenges with defining, implementing, and testing. Finally the shift from system or component security, to overall business and mission security will be covered.
wk 11 Mar 27

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wk 12 Apr 3

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wk 13 Apr 10

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wk 14 Apr 17

Speaker: James Price of Clearwater Analytics
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wk 15 Apr 24

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wk 16 May 1

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wk 17 May 8 NO FINAL EXAM

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